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The Best

Carpet Plants For Aquarium

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Luffy Decorative Aquatic Moss Wall or Floor Mesh Kit, 2 Mesh Pieces, 10 Cable...
  • BUILD YOUR OWN ENCHANTING MOSS WALL OR MOSS FLOOR --- The innovative Luffy Moss Wall Mesh Kit...
  • LOW MAINTENANCE DECORATION --- Once set up and installed into your aquarium, the Luffy Aquatic...
  • CAN BE USED WITH VARIOUS TYPES OF MOSS --- Whether you prefer Christmas moss, java moss or some...
  • TWO DURABLE PLASTIC MESH PIECES --- Two smooth 12” x 8” (30cm x 20cm) plastic pieces of...

Buyer's Guide: Carpet Plants For Aquarium

Carpet Plants For Aquariums

Carpet plants are often confused with fake plants, and in some cases are considered harmful. The truth is that most plants are beneficial to an aquarium, and do not pose a threat to fish or corals. The Best Carpet Plants For Aquarium With Large Style Aquaria are usually easy to maintain and add to overtime. They can provide the desired decoration or shelter in any sized aquarium.

The best carpet plants for large-style aqua aquariums are usually easy to maintain and add to over time. These include true aquatic mosses, epiphytes, some forms of aquatic ferns, some brachystosis, and sometimes frondosa. Most of these should be maintained in heavy water in the wild. Epiphytes can be successfully kept in low water, and in acidic conditions as well. Some fern species may be too small to survive in extreme salinity, and some forms of ferns can become invasive if overgrown.

The best carpet plants for large-style aqua tanks are usually easy to maintain and add to over time. These include true aquatic mosses, epiphytes, some forms of aquatic ferns, some brachystosis, and sometimes frondosa. Most of these should be maintained in heavy water in the wild. Some fern species can be successfully kept in low water, and in acidic conditions also.

Some of these are not really carpet plants, and are actually parasitic plants. This includes java fern, hepatica, hypothenium, starfish rosae, polyps and velvet plants. All of these should be avoided by aquarium algae prevention methods, and some might be toxic to fish if kept in the tank for long periods. Some plants can even be leeched by fish, which is toxic to the other animals in the tank.

So, what are the best choices for large tanks, and what are the best carpeting options? Carpet plants come in many different varieties, including java ferns, which are a good choice, and a wide range of other mosses such as phlox, which is a better choice if you have an alkaline tank. Epiphytes are not toxic, but they will need regular maintenance and fertilizer from time to time, as they do in natural environments. Some of these are ornamental, but most are not. Some common epiphyte varieties are creeping pennywhacker, creeping phlox, starfish rose, and hyacinth starfish.

Some algae varieties, such as polyps and velvet plants, are not toxic to fish, but they do need regular maintenance. They come in many different forms, such as rhizomes, tubers, epiphytes, and some ground covers. Some are very attractive, but may not provide a lot of growth. Others, such as wheat grass, may be very productive and hardy but are rarely seen in large aquariums. If you choose wheat grass like a carpet, you should consider whether or not it grows naturally in your area and whether or not it is suitable for large or growing aquariums.

Some types of carpeting do well in humid areas but may flop in more temperate areas. So, check before you buy. There are also some large selections of silk carpeting, such as red wisteria, which are not toxic, but do not do as well in low-lying areas, such as sand, gravel, or shaded areas in your aquarium. These plants may add color to a tank, but may not perform as well as some other types of carpeting.

There are other, more expensive choices for use as aquarium flooring, including nylon, faux fiberglass, and even real wool. The most common type of carpeting is non-stretch carpeting, which is made to look like real plants and is available in a variety of colors. If your tank is already set up in these areas, you can use these to give the appearance of a carpet in those areas.